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Things To Do When Power Goes Down At Work

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When you get fired up about your job, it’s easy to forget the responsibilities that come with the territory. But when your power goes out at work — or in the middle of a big project — there are some things you should do to stay on top of your game.

So what should you do? Here are some tips for keeping things running smoothly when disaster strikes:

Be prepared – Before the outage occurs, make sure that you have an emergency plan in place for if your power goes out. This will ensure that your business is ready for any situation that may arise.

Make sure you have enough staff on hand – While most businesses don’t need people on hand all of the time, having them available during emergencies will make a huge difference when something unexpected happens and you need help fast!

Keep your computers running – As soon as possible after an electrical outage, shut down any computers or devices that aren’t needed and unplug their cords from outlets so they don’t continue to draw power from the outlet where they’re plugged in (which can cause more damage).

Make sure those who need medical attention get it – If a patient is experiencing medical problems due to an electrical outage, make sure that they understand what needs to be done (and write down instructions) so they can follow them correctly when things return to normal again!

Stay positive – Even if your office is dark and cold, try not to let that get you down. We’re human and we’re going to make mistakes from time to time — but it’s important not to let them fester into bad habits.

Turn off computers and all other electronic equipment that you do not need during power outages especially if there is no back-up power available from your generator or any other source.

Figure out where the problem lies and fix it right away. If you have a backup generator, use it immediately. But if there’s no other way to keep the lights on, prepare for an extended outage by stocking up on food and supplies like batteries and flashlights so that you don’t have to worry about turning on a stove or using candles for light when power returns (which could take days).

Tell everyone involved what’s going on so they know how much time they have left before everything goes off-line again (and how long until they can expect things back up). This will help everyone understand their roles in getting things back up.

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